Joe Hines Makes Stuff
Designer + Maker
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reSKIN

 

reSKIN

PROJECT DETAILS: The Active Thermorgulation facade system is characterized by variation among its components which come together as a layered system to effectively regulate temperatures. Such a system was inspired by the thermoregulatory strategies of the leatherback sea turtle, a species which is capable of surviving in both extreme high and low water temperatures. Thus deriving methods of counter current heat exchange, thermal inertia and the retention of metabolic heat which were then translated into a series of components. When used in conjunction with analysis of environmental and programmatic factors a specific placement of such units can be defined and then applied to an existing building condition and effectively and efficiently regulate temperatures within the built environment year round .

TEAM:  Joseph Hines 

METHODS:  Rhinoceros, Grasshopper, Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign

ACCOLADES: 


MATERIAL INTELLIGENCE + PHYSIOLOGY

This studio engaged the problems raised by our rapid pace of urbanization and the ecological impact of our built environment. The result was an envelope condition which could operate as a means to capture, transform store and distribute energy in various forms.

This project looked towards the biological strategies of heat mitigation of a Leatherback sea turtle. Through processes of counter current heat exchange, heat is circulated to the animals core in an effort to retain heat. When in warm climates heat is then circulated towards surface in order to allow heat to dissipate to surrounding water. The translation into a performative architecture began with the development and abstraction from the physiological as mechanisms and behavioral means to mediate both heat gain and loss.

Similar strategies were utilized for structural means. The basic strategy the framework and skin for this scheme involved a similar set of components, several plates [populated with units], a connective tissue, and a defined series of ridges where the previous two components converge.